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The PBIS family engagement resources on this page relate to the questions on the VTPBIS Family Engagement Surveys. These resources are from a wide variety of sources and are provided for informational purposes only.*

Family Engagement Modules for PBIS Schools

These four modules were developed and presented by the Vermont Family Network in partnership with the Vermont PBIS State Team. The intended audience is school PBIS leadership teams. The first three modules address family engagement at the three levels of PBIS: Universal, Targeted, and Intensive. The last module is a review of the PBIS Family Engagement Survey and Resources.

PBIS at School – Information for Families 

  • Epstein’s Types of Parent Engagement and School-wide PBS Activities
    • Look here for ideas on how to engage families in PBIS. Ideas are organized by the six types of parent engagement identified by Dr. Joyce Epstein of the National Network of Partnership Schools.
  • Family Guide to PBIS – WI
    • This 38-page Power Point is from the Wisconsin Family Assistance Center for Education, Training and Support. It’s a general overview of PBIS which covers all the basics of who, what when, where and how. Schools can adapt and use this for presentations to groups of families or faculty/staff.
  • What Families Need to Know About Positive Behavioral Supports and Interventions
    • This 30-minute PBIS overview webinar (YouTube video) is for families. It was recorded in December 2016 by Amy Wheeler-Sutton, Training and Development Coordinator, VTPBIS State Leadership Team. Schools could this webinar in various ways: link it on the school’s website; send it to all families as part of a PBIS email communication; view it with groups of families perhaps as a conversation starter; and share it with new families and faculty/staff to orient them to PBIS.
  • Minnesota School-Wide PBIS
    • The PACER Center in Minnesota is a wealth of information on many different topics. This section of their website on PBIS includes an overview, publications, and a series of training modules for families. There are 5 training modules (videos, scripts, and Power Points): 1 – Use these principles to improve your child’s life and future; 2 – Using a functional behavior assessment to understand behavior; 3 – Learn how effective behavior support at school leads to better education for all students; 4 – Supporting your child’s positive behavior at home and in the community; and 5 – Parent involvement and leadership. Schools may use or adapt these materials for communications with families.
  • Parents Partnering in PBS – Top Ten Behavior Tips
    • Children do best when behavioral expectations and approaches to encouraging positive behavior are consistent across environments – school and home. This half-page list of behavior tips is for parents. You can use or adapt it as part of your overall PBIS communication plan. It can also be a conversation starter with families who attend an in-person conversation about using the principles of PBIS in the home.
  • Pawsitive Notes Home
    • Students and families like to receive good news! In some schools, teachers set goals for how many positive notes home they will send per student in a given time period. Here is an example form for sending positive notes home. Notice that it contains the school’s behavioral expectations, a place for the student’s name, and an area for the teacher to write a short note. You can use this as a guide to create a form for use in your school.
  • PBIS Brochure for Families (sample #1)
    • Schools use various ways to communicate the basics of the school’s PBIS program to families. This sample brochure includes a statement of purpose; the school’s behavioral expectations; information on how students will be recognized for following the expectations; how the behavioral expectations will be reinforced; and how students will be redirected when they are not following the expectations. You can use this as a sample to create a brochure for your school.
  • PBIS Brochure for Families (sample #2)
    • Schools use various ways to communicate the basics of the school’s PBIS program to families. This sample brochure includes the school’s behavioral expectations; their process for sending positive notes home; the steps the school follows to improve a student’s behavior; and a section that asks parents and their children to review the information in the brochure, sign the form, and return it to the school. You can use this as a sample to create a brochure for your school.
  • PBIS Brochure for Families (sample #3)
    • Schools use various ways to communicate the basics of the school’s PBIS program to families. This sample brochure includes the school’s behavioral expectations; information on how to earn rewards and use them; the student behavior expectations chart; and a section that asks parents and their children to review the information in the brochure, sign the form, and return it to the school. Families who return the form are entered into a drawing to win a $25 gift certificate. You can use this as a sample to create a brochure for your school.
  • PBIS Calendar
    • This monthly calendar for the school year is from the Missouri School Wide Positive Behavior Support Leadership Team. It lists the Leadership Team members; their contact information; roles and responsibilities; training dates; data collection dates; tips for PBIS coaches and administrators; ideas on how to involve families in PBIS; and other useful information. Families may be interested in learning about some of the topics which are covered in this calendar particularly those parents who may be part of a school’s PBIS Leadership Team.
  • PBIS OSEP Technical Assistance Center – PBIS Family Partnership
    • The Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports was established by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP). Emphasis is given to the impact of implementing PBIS on the social, emotional and academic outcomes for students with disabilities. This website has many different resources for and about family involvement in PBIS. Since the focus of this Technical Assistance Center is children with disabilities, the section under “School” entitled “PBIS and the Law” may be helpful in addressing any questions about PBIS that families of children in special education may pose.
  • PBIS Parent Student Handbook
    • This 26-page PBIS Parent/Student Handbook from Royal Oaks elementary school in North Carolina is packed with information including: PBIS overview, behavior expectations/rules matrix, cards used to record behavior, recognition system, check in-check out, interventions by tier, office referral and discipline process, behavior types definitions (major/minor), school bus rules/discipline referral, and an open invitation to families to attend monthly PBIS meetings or join the school’s PBIS leadership team. Schools can use this as a guide to creating their own Parent Student Handbook.
  • PBIS PPT Presentation Vermont PBIS State Team
    • This is a 35-slide Power Point by the Vermont PBIS State Team with the following learning objectives: learn about school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports ; see and hear examples of PBIS in Vermont schools; consider strategies for using PBIS at home; and discuss how to learn more and get involved. Using PBIS at home (slides 25-33) and how families can support PBIS (slide 24 and 34) may be particular interest. Schools can use or adapt this presentation for families or faculty/staff.
  • School-wide PBS Newsletter (Kansas)
    • This 12-page newsletter from the Kansas Institute for Positive Behavior Support at the University of Kansas addresses two issues which schools may wish to communicate to families: How is PBIS different from other strategies? (pages 3-4) and How is the effectiveness of PBIS being evaluated? (pages 4-5). There are also case studies of Kansas schools (pages 6-11) which schools may find useful as a guide in telling their school’s story of PBIS to families.
  • Elementary School PBIS Manual
    • This 16-page sample Elementary School PBIS Manual was developed by the Vermont PBIS State Team. The content is similar to the PBIS Parent/Student Handbook from Royal Oaks elementary school in North Carolina (see list above). This Manual includes some information which is not in the other sample such as the responsibilities of the PBIS teams at the Universal, Targeted, and Intensive levels. For a version of this Manual that you can edit for your school’s use, contact the Vermont PBIS State Team.
  • Using Rewards within School-wide PBIS
    • The objectives of this 70-slide Power Point presentation is to: define the challenge faced in many schools as they consider the use of rewards; share a research foundation; provide examples of reward use at all grade levels; and share examples of different types of rewards including: school-wide, classroom, individual student, and faculty/staff. Although this presentation by leaders in the field is technical in nature, it may be helpful for families or faculty/staff who need more information about the research around reward systems.
  • Universally Designing Positive Behavior Support for All
    • This Power Point presentation (117 pages) focuses on PBIS and students with disabilities. Its purpose is to: identify evidence-­‐based practices for supporting students with disabilities; identify tools and procedures for helping school teams to better design supports for students with disabilities at all three tiers; and develop a plan to ensure that data, systems, and practices are in place within schools to support students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Disabilities.

PBIS at Home – Information for Families 

  • Reward Systems
    • PBIS World has a section on Reward Systems which explains why, when and how to use rewards in the classroom. The list of reward resources is a mix of ideas for use by teachers in the classroom and for parents to use at home.
  • Resources to Increase Your Family Engagement
    • The Wisconsin PBIS Network has a wide variety of resources including Cool Tools for parents to teach Morning, Bedtime, and Homework Routines. The Guidebook for Serving on Groups can also be helpful for parents who are members of the School’s PBIS Leadership Team.
  • Behavior Change Plan for Use by Parents
    • This is a simple worksheet to help parents identify their child’s problem behaviors, replacement behaviors they would like to see, steps to replace the problem behaviors, and how they will know that the steps they took actually worked.
  • Creating a Home Plan with School-wide PBIS
    • This fact sheet explains the basics of PBIS and invites parents to use the school’s behavioral expectations to create a Home Plan that addresses behaviors in these categories: Before School, After School, On Weekends, and In the Community.
  • Creating Home School Partnerships
    • Howard Muscutt, a leader in PBIS, is one of several authors of this 9-page article which emphasizes the importance of home school partnerships in transforming students’ educational experience. The article focuses on the New Hampshire schools that have implemented PBIS. Barriers to family engagement are reviewed and specific strategies to engage families are outlined.
  • Family Behavior 101
    • This Power Point is for families to help them develop a deeper understanding of behavior and explore pro-active strategies. Topics covered include: temperament categories for children, types of problem behavior, the functions of behavior, and the process to change behavior. Using PBIS at home is also covered including: thinking about your home, expectations at home, teaching behaviors at home, and responding to misbehaviors at home.
  • Getting Behavior in Shape at Home
    • This article has a hypothetical situation of a child who refuses to eat dinner almost every night. Steps to change the child’s behavior include: brainstorm ideas to figure out why the behavior exists; test each idea noting which ones show positive changes in the child’s behavior; praise positive results; and notice how changing the environment and the behavior of the adults brings about positive changes. Parents can follow these steps when looking at their own child’s challenging behaviors.
  • PBIS Compendium
    • This website has a variety of materials including two Power Point presentations for families: Positive Interactions and Ideas and Tips for Peaceful and Stress-free Parenting. The first PPT includes information on effective praise (positive and negative) and examples of correction, pre-correction and non-verbal feedback. The second PPT covers habit builders, rewards in the home, and scripts that parents can use with their children. The Sample “Family Cool Tools “Guide to Planning includes information on how families can adapt and teach the school’s behavioral expectations in the home.
  • PBIS at Home
    • This Power Point presentation breaks down the use of PBIS in the home into four steps: clear expectations, family meetings, the use of positive reinforcements for appropriate behavior, and the use of consequences for problem behaviors.
  • PBIS Vacation Letter to Families
    • This letter for families is from Fletcher Elementary school in Cambridge Vermont. It was sent before spring break reminding families of the school’s behavioral expectations, encouraging parents to acknowledge their child’s positive behaviors by giving them feathers, and then reporting back to the school on the number of behaviors recognized during the break. The purpose of the letter was to strengthen the home-school connection. You can use this sample to create your own letter to families.
  • PBIS Home Matrix
    • This is a completed sample of a PBIS Home Matrix. In this matrix, the school’s behavioral expectations are listed in the left column and across the top are the times and places that the parents will focus on in their home: Getting Up in the Morning; Getting to School; Clean-Up Time; Time to Relax; Homework Time; Mealtime; and Getting Ready for Bed. Share this sample along with a blank template so families have a tool to help them use PBIS in their homes.

Practical Functional Behavior Analysis for Families

  • Practical Functional Behavior Analysis for Families Part 1 and Part 2
    • This two-part webinar with presenters from the Vermont Agency of Education is for families and others. Each webinar is one hour. Part 1 focuses on how families can conduct a Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) and part 2 on how they can develop a Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP). Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) has been established as a systematic, evidence-based process for assessing the relationship between a behavior and the context in which that behavior occurs. The primary goal of FBA is to guide in the development of an effective positive Behavioral Intervention Plan (BIP). Interventions based on an FBA have been shown to result in significant changes in student behavior for students with mild to moderate problem behaviors.
    • There are 5 training modules (Power Points) in this series from the PACER Center: 1. Use these principles to improve your child’s life and future, 2. Using a Functional Behavioral Assessment to Understand Behavior, 3. Learn how effective behavior support at school leads to better education for all students, 4. Supporting your child’s positive behavior at home and in the community, and 5. Parent Involvement and Leadership. These modules can help families learn more about bringing PBIS into their homes.
  • Universal Preventative Practices for Use in the Home
    • The Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice developed this six-page guide for families who have children with behavioral problems. A universal preventative practice is a method for addressing problem behavior in a child. It is an approach applied to an environment, such as the home, to proactively avoid problem behaviors while supporting the child’s development and use of appropriate behaviors. The subjects covered in this guide are: Routines and Physical Arrangements, Defining and Teaching Expectations, and Planning Systematic Responses.
    • This webinar for families is from the Vermont Family Network. It covers the information in module 4 of the PACER Center’s PBIS Training Modules for Families – “PBIS – Supporting Your Child’s Positive Behavior at Home and in the Community.”

Family Members on PBIS Leadership Teams 

    • This Power Point reviews ways schools can communicate PBIS to parents. It also addresses how schools can invite parents to be part of the Universal PBIS Team including information on: who to invite; how to recruit; how to retain; and how to train parent representatives.
    • This list of 10 skills for Families on PBIS Leadership Teams is from the New Hampshire Center for Effective Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Schools could use or adapt this list to invite, recruit, or retain parent members on the PBIS Leadership Team.
    • This resource is a Power Point from Wisconsin which begins with ideas on how to prepare staff to work with family members on the team. The many different roles that family members can fulfill on the team are addressed: advisory, leadership, planning, evaluation, practice, knowledge, community, and partnership. Also included are sample surveys which measure a school’s ability to create a welcoming environment for all families.

Additional Resources:

  • PBIS World’s Behavior and PBIS Interventions Matrix
    • This matrix lists many different student behaviors (e.g., disruptive, name calling, tantrums/out of control, etc.); a description of how that behavior looks in the classroom; tier 1 interventions; data tracking forms and strategies; and tier 2 interventions if needed.
  • Family, School, and Community Partnership Fundamentals
    • This rubric from the State of Massachusetts is based on six fundamentals: 1: Welcoming All Stakeholders; 2: Communicating Effectively; 3: Supporting the Success of Children and Youth; 4: Advocating for Each Child and Youth; 5: Sharing Power and Responsibility; and 6: Partnering with the Community. Each Fundamental is organized along a continuum of Levels of Development and Implementation for specific Indicators which reflect the responsibilities, opportunities, and expectations of families, schools, school districts, and communities in partnering together to support student performance and academic achievement.
  • School-wide Family Engagement Rubric
    • The purpose of this comprehensive Family Engagement Rubric from the Flamboyan Foundation is to: illustrate what effective family engagement looks like in its stages of development; help schools focus and prioritize their family engagement efforts; help schools learn and generate new ideas and strategies for family engagement; and guide the Flamboyan Foundation’s technical assistance and professional development support for schools and school staff.
  • Responding to Problem Behaviors in School by Crone, Horner, and Hawken
    • Amazon describes this book as follows: “This bestselling book has been used in schools across the country to establish efficient and cost-effective systems of Tier II positive behavior support. The Behavior Education Program (BEP) was developed for the approximately 10-15% of students who fail to meet schoolwide disciplinary expectations but do not yet require intensive, individualized services. Clear, step-by-step guidelines are provided for implementing the approach, which incorporates daily behavioral feedback, positive adult attention, and increased home–school collaboration. In a large-size format with lay-flat binding to facilitate photocopying, the book includes reproducible daily progress reports, handouts, and planning tools. Purchasers also get access to a Web page where they can download and print the reproducible materials.”
  • National Network of Partnership Schools
    • Established at Johns Hopkins University in 1996, the National Network of Partnership Schools (NNPS) invites schools, districts, states, and organizations to join together and use research-based approaches to organize and sustain excellent programs of family and community involvement that will increase student success in school. This website provides NNPS members with updated information, research results, and ideas for action from the NNPS staff and members across the country. The site also informs prospective members about NNPS approaches, benefits, and services. There is a cost to join the NNPS.
  • PTA National Standards for Family School Partnerships
    • The National PTA has six standards for Family School Partnerships: Standard 1: Welcoming all families into the school community; Standard 2: Communicating effectively; Standard 3: Supporting student success; Standard 4: Speaking up for every child; Standard 5: Sharing power; and Standard 6: Collaborating with community. The National Standards Assessment Guide (the full version) is available for free on this website. The Guide includes an introduction and detailed information on each of the six standards.
  • National Association for Family, School, and Community Engagement (NAFSCE)
    • The National Association for Family, School, and Community Engagement (NAFSCE), founded in September 2014, is the first membership association focused solely on advancing family, school, and community engagement (FSCE). NAFSCE was established to provide the long-needed platform for advancing high impact practices, promoting evidence–based policies, building capacity and leadership in the field, and upholding FSCE as a core strategy for improving child development and student achievement.
  • U.S. Department of Education Family and Community Engagement including Dual Capacity Framework
    • The Dual Capacity-Building Framework from the U.S. Department of Education was formulated using the research on effective family engagement and home–school partnership strategies and practices, adult learning and motivation, and leadership development. The Framework is helpful for designing family engagement initiatives that build capacity among educators and families to partner with one another around student success. Based in existing research and best practices, the “Dual  Framework for Family–School Partnerships” is designed to act as a scaffold for the development of family engagement strategies, policies, and programs. It is not a blueprint for engagement initiatives, which must be designed to fit the particular contexts in which they are carried out. Instead, the Dual Capacity-Building Framework should be seen as a compass, laying out the goals and conditions necessary to chart a path toward effective family engagement efforts that are linked to student achievement and school improvement.
  • Harvard Family Research Project: Family Involvement
    • The new name for this organization is the Global Family Research Project. This organization is committed to meeting the growing demand for information on effective ways to support family involvement in children’s learning and development. Among the various publications and resources on this website is a set of research briefs entitled “Family Involvement Makes a Difference.” These briefs examine family involvement in the home and school in early childhood, elementary school, and middle and high school settings. Taken together, these briefs make the case that family involvement predicts children’s academic achievement and social development as they progress from early childhood programs through K–12 schools and into higher education.
  • Beyond the Bake Sale by Henderson, Mapp, Johnson and Davies
    • Amazon describes this book as follows: “Countless studies demonstrate that students with parents actively involved in their education at home and school are more likely to earn higher grades and test scores, enroll in higher-level programs, graduate from high school, and go on to post-secondary education. Beyond the Bake Sale shows how to form these essential partnerships and how to make them work. Packed with tips from principals and teachers, checklists, and an invaluable resource section, Beyond the Bake Sale reveals how to build strong collaborative relationships and offers practical advice for improving interactions between parents and teachers.”
  • Building Parent Engagement in Schools by Ferlazzo
    • Amazon describes this book as follows: “This work is a report on the positive impact of parental involvement on their child’s academics and on the school at large. It includes four specific real-life examples of parental involvement initiatives: home visits, the use of technology, school/community gardens, and community organizing. It offers bibliographic listings for additional print and online resources.
  • Parent Involvement: Nine Truths You Must Know Now
    • The Parent Institute offers these nine truths based on their work in effectively involving parents over the last 20 years: 1. Parent involvement is all about the children; 2. Parent involvement boosts student achievement; 3. Communication with parents must be carefully planned and two-way; 4. It is important to treat parents as partners instead of as clients; 5. Parent trust in your school is required for student achievement; 6. Parent involvement barriers are real—and must be addressed; 7. School staff makes all the difference in parent involvement; 8. It is important to make sure you don’t have a parent involvement disconnect and 9. It is important to know why parents say they are not more involved. Read the full report for more information on each of these nine truths.
  • Vermont Family Network:
    • Family Engagement – Barriers to family engagement are real and must be overcome school by school. This section of the Vermont Family Network website has resources for families and resources for schools to overcome such barriers and create authentic family engagement.
    • Multi-Tiered Systems of Support – Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) is a systemic, continuous-improvement framework in which data-based problem-solving and decision making is practiced across all levels of the educational system for supporting students. Both Response to Intervention RTI and Positive Behavioral Instructional Support/PBIS are examples of multi-tiered systems of support. This section of the Vermont Family Network website describes MTSS and how parents can get involved.
  • Partnership for Change: A Guide for Engaging ELL Families: Twenty Strategies for School Leadership Teams
    • This guide from the state of Colorado offers school leaders twenty big ideas that will help them strengthen home-school partnerships on behalf of English Language Learners (ELL) students. A list of specific strategies follows each idea, along with questions for reflection that can be used for professional development activities on an individual basis or in group settings. The guide includes 6 sections: Connecting with ELL Families, Communicating Important Information, Parent Participation, Parents as Leaders, Community Partnerships, and Creating an Action Plan.
  • Burlington Family-School Communication Study
  • Winooski Family-School Communication Study
    • In May 2013, the Partnership for Change, a grant -funded collaboration between the Burlington and Winooski school districts, commissioned Youth Catalytics to conduct a study of family-school communication in the two districts. Communication between schools and families is challenging everywhere, but those challenges are particularly complex in Burlington and Winooski, where large numbers of parents/guardians speak languages other than English, and families in general vary greatly in their ability to navigate the school system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of district communication strategies and make practical recommendations on how to improve communication so that all parents and guardians are fully engaged in their children’s education. This extensive report (112 pages) reviews key research questions and findings. It may be of particular interest to schools in Burlington and Winooski.

 

The Vermont PBIS State Team is not responsible for the content, quality, or accuracy of any off-site materials referenced or linked through the VTPBIS website. Links from the VTPBIS website to other sites on the Internet do not constitute an endorsement of those sites. These links are provided for informational purposes only. It is the responsibility of the user to evaluate the content, quality, and accuracy of materials or information obtained from other sites.